Estates & Wills & Trusts

Your health — don’t let your financial guard down

By Suzana Popovic-Montag

We’re lucky in Canada — our healthcare system pays for doctor bills and hospital visits, and many employer-sponsored benefit plans provide for supplementary health insurance. Even better, universal care is actually expanding in places, such as the recent introduction of free pharmacare for those age 24 and under in Ontario.

But don’t get lulled — there are costs to healthcare. With our comprehensive public coverage, it can be easy to think that your costs will be covered if you were in an accident or experienced a serious illness. But many of us simply aren’t aware of what won’t be covered. For example, out-of-pocket costs could include loss of income (especially if you are self-employed), expensive uninsured prescription drugs and medical supplies, childcare during recovery, or even home renovations to accommodate the illness. And psychological therapy fees represent another potential cost, as mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability in Canada.

So, what can you do to ensure that you are financially prepared for a sudden, serious bad health event? Here are three options to consider:

  • An emergency fund/line of credit: You may need access to cash quickly if a health emergency arises and having a “rainy day fund” for unplanned or unexpected expenses is ideal for that purpose. A line of credit also serves this purpose, although it involves taking on debt and all the costs that that entails.
  • Disability insurance coverage to replace income: Disability insurance replaces a portion of your income if you are unable to work due to an illness or disability. Disability policies vary widely, so even if you have coverage at work, it’s worth checking whether additional personal coverage could be beneficial.
  • Critical illness insurance to cover other costs: This insurance provides a tax-free lump sum benefit upon the diagnosis of a serious illness, such as cancer, heart attack, stroke, blindness, paralysis, kidney failure and multiple sclerosis. Unlike disability insurance, the payment is not linked to your inability to return to work, and you have complete freedom to use the money any way that you wish, including paying for treatment outside of Canada that may not be covered by provincial healthcare.

Of course, rule number one is to stay healthy. But in the event you don’t, be prepared financially. A little planning can go a long way.

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