Sarah O'Connor

Sarah O'Connor
FIRM:
O’Connor Richardson Professional Corporation
POSITION:
Principal
AREAS OF PRACTICE:
Civil Litigation, Commercial Litigation, Corporate
PHONE:

Toronto litigator Sarah O’Connor, principal with O’Connor Richardson Professional Corporation, specializes in corporate/commercial and civil litigation.

She earned a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in history and geography from Queen’s University in 2001 before graduating with a Bachelor of Laws from Osgoode Hall Law School in 2004. She was called to the bar in 2005.

Ms. O’Connor studied international tax and corporate commercial law as an exchange student at the University of West Indies in 2003. In 2013 and 2014, she earned Post Graduate Certificates of Laws in International Business Law from the University of London.

In 2014, Ms. O’Connor earned a Master of Laws in International Business Law from the University of London.

Ms. O’Connor has volunteered as duty counsel with LawHelp Ontario since 2009. She also sits on the board of directors and volunteers as Test Chair with the Central Toronto Skating Club. She is vice-president of Phi Delta Phi, International Legal Fraternity.

Ms. O’Connor is a member of the Ontario Trial Lawyers Association where she acts as a roster lawyer with its Trial Lawyers for Veterans program to help injured veterans who have been denied benefits.

She’s held various roles with Business Network International (BNI) to advise new members of BNI Bay Street procedures and policies. She has acted as mentor, vice-president and education co-ordinator.

Ms. O'Connor represents individuals, small- and medium-sized corporations in litigation before the Superior Court of Ontario, Ontario Court of Appeal and the Federal Court of Canada, as well in various administrative tribunals.

She also handles state accountability, trademark and sexual disease litigation, landlord/tenant disputes, cases against public officers and claims against the provincial and federal governments.

Sarah O'Connor Posts

Court has domain in determining injunctive relief: O'Connor

A recent Ontario Superior Court decision confirms that although a contract may contain a clause setting out when a breach causes irreparable harm, the court will ultimately determine whether harm has been established and if injunctive relief is appropriate, says Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor. Read more

Ruling demonstrates progress in court's view of casual sex

A recent case where a man was found guilty of sexual assault after he agreed to wear a condom but proceeded to have unprotected sex with his partner shows that the courts are more open to the fact that people can set limits when participating in casual sex, says Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor. Read more

Parties usually consent to minor claim amendments: O'Connor

Parties in civil cases can usually amend statements of claim at any stage of litigation, says Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor. Read more

Going to the dogs — a tricky workplace decision

Employers that allow dogs and other animals in the workplace are inviting problems, but they can cut the risk with careful planning and effective pet policies, says Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor. Read more

There are consequences for backing out of a contract

If a party breaches a contract they can potentially be held liable for damages even if they didn’t benefit from the action, says Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor. Read more

Beer Store faces tough task to win damages from province

The Beer Store faces an uphill battle to win damages from the province following the cancellation of its beer distribution contract, says Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor. Read more

Bar set high for awarding costs against counsel

Seeking costs directly from opposing counsel is an uphill battle, says Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor. Read more

Loose group lottery play leads to lawsuits

Players may find themselves in court fighting over winnings if they fail to follow suggested guidelines for groups purchasing lottery tickets, Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor tells AdvocateDaily.com. Read more

Assessing responsibility and liability in a plane crash

Although Canada’s safety watchdog has cited a “significant safety issue” with the doors of a popular small airplane that crashed last August, they would not be the main focus in assigning responsibility for the death of three of the plane's passengers, Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor tells AdvocateDaily.com. Read more

Municipalities overreact with bans on popular activities

Unsubstantiated fear of litigation may be driving municipalities to ban favourite pastimes such as winter sports and riding in horse-drawn carriages, Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor tells AdvocateDaily.com. Read more

Changes bring Canada in line with global trademark rules

Amendments to Canada’s Intellectual Property laws will bring a more simplified process to attaining global protection, Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor tells AdvocateDaily.com. Read more

Hockey player should hold his ground in abortion lawsuit: O'Connor

A professional hockey player sued for allegedly failing to pay for an ex-girlfriend’s abortion should aggressively resist the lawsuit, Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor tells AdvocateDaily.com. Read more

Law Help Centres too valuable to lose: O'Connor

Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor fears a valuable cost-saving program for self-represented litigants may never return if allowed to fail due to a lack of funding. Read more

Tough to build a case for homeowners suing contractors

Homeowners face an uphill battle when it comes to winning disputes with contractors, Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor tells AdvocateDaily.com. Read more

Legal disputes over lottery wins are becoming more common: O'Connor

It was a good move for a Nova Scotia woman to settle a lawsuit she launched against her nephew to recover half of a $1.2-million lottery-ticket win that was awarded to him because she would have had an uphill battle to win the case, says Toronto civil litigator Sarah O’Connor. Read more