Littler Global

Littler Global
Littler Global
Employment & Labour

Littler is the largest global employment and labor law practice, with more than 1,500 attorneys in 80 offices worldwide. Littler represents management in all aspects of employment and labor law and serves as a single-source solution provider to the global employer community. Consistently recognized in the industry as a leading and innovative law practice, Littler has been litigating, mediating and negotiating some of the most influential employment law cases and labor contracts on record for over 75 years. Littler Global is the collective trade name for an international legal practice, the practicing member entities of which are separate and distinct professional firms. 

Littler’s international offices span three continents – North America, South America and Europe – and include: Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, France, Germany, Guatemala, Honduras, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Puerto Rico, the United Kingdom and Venezuela. The firm’s global capabilities also include a number of U.S.-based lawyers who are qualified practitioners in Australia, Brazil, China, the United Kingdom and South Africa, among other countries. Littler is experienced in handling multi-country labour and employment matters that span the globe and often work with leading attorneys in jurisdictions worldwide to provide clients with global legal services and a single point of contact.

With its collective knowledge and experience, it provides clients with comprehensive legal services covering the full range of workplace issues, including General Labour and Employment Advice, Litigation and Dispute Resolution, Labour Relations, Compliance, Codes of Conduct, Workforce Management, Data Privacy, Employment and Transfer Agreements, Corporate Labour Governance, and Knowledge Management and Training.

Littler Global In The News
Littler Global Guide - Canada - Q1 2019

Browse through brief employment and labor law updates from around the globe. Contact a  Littler attorney  for more information or view our  global locations . Read more

Bill 66, restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act, 2018 has received royal assent, amending Ontario, Canada’s labour and employment laws once again

Bill 66,  Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act, 2018  (“Bill 66”) received Royal Assent on April 3, 2019. 1  Amendments to the  Employment Standards Act, 2000  (“ESA”) made by Bill 66 have not changed since we  first reported  on the Bill when it passed First Reading. Amendments made by Bill 66 to the section of the  Labour Relations Act, 1995  (“LRA”) relating to the construction industry, however, have  been slightly modified.     Read more

Ontario, Canada: employers can provide candid job references

Ontario employers can speak candidly about former employees' weaknesses when providing job references, as long as the dominant motive for the reference is not malicious, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) recently indicated. The SCC declined to review a lower court's finding that a plaintiff failed to prove her former manager defamed her by giving her a negative reference that led to revocation of a job offer. Read more

Ontario, Canada companies beware: class action lawsuits alleging worker misclassification are on the rise

It appears there is a movement afoot in Ontario to change behavior around the classification of employees as independent contractors.  Beginning in 2015, we began to see a number of class action lawsuits that allege misclassification and claim significant monetary liability. They include claims for employee entitlements under the  Employment Standards Act, 2000  (ESA), including minimum wage, overtime pay, vacation pay, public holiday pay, and premium pay; claims for Canada Pension Plan and Employment Insurance contributions owed to employees; claims for adverse tax consequences sustained by employees as a result of the alleged misclassification; and claims for general, punitive, aggravated, and exemplary damages. Read more

Littler global guide - Canada - Q4 2018

Browse through brief employment and labor law updates from around the globe. Contact a  Littler attorney  for more information or view our  global locations . Read more

Decisions involving termination of long-term employees should concern employers

Employers considering terminating long-term employees in Canada should be aware of two relatively recent decisions.  In one case,  Dawe , 2018 ONSC 3130, the terminated employee, age 62, was a highly paid Senior Vice President employed for 37 years when terminated.  In the second case,  Bailey , 2018 BCSC 235, the 60-year-old employee had held a sales position for 17 years when terminated.  These cases suggest that some courts believe that long-term employees of advanced age should not be terminated without being provided the financial equivalent of what they would have received had they been given reasonable notice. These courts appear to be willing to substantially extend the usual cap on reasonable notice periods or use damage awards to maneuver around enforceable termination clauses. Read more

10 key developments in Canadian labour & employment law in 2018

Canada saw significant developments in labour and employment law in 2018.  As we embark on a new year, we will undoubtedly see the landscape in this ever-changing area of law continue to evolve.  Below we provide an overview of 10 key 2018 developments for your review: Read more

New Ontario, Canada Employment Standards poster available (Poster 8.0)

The Ontario Ministry of Labour has released a new employment standards poster (link below) to coincide with recent legislative changes due to Bill 47,  Making Ontario Open for Business Act , which effectively reverses certain changes made by a widely publicized law enacted last year—Bill 148,  The Fair Workplaces Better Jobs Act, 2017 . Previously, we wrote about both  Bill 148  and  Bill 47 . Read more

Changes to Ontario, Canada's Employment Standards Act and Labour Relations Act Keep on Coming

On December 6, 2018, Bill 66,  Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act, 2018  (“Bill 66”), passed First Reading. 1  If Bill 66 is passed in its current form, it will impact several statutes in the province.  Of particular interest to employers is the proposed impact of Bill 66 on the  Employment Standards Act, 2000  (ESA), which sets the minimum wage, hours of work, leave entitlements and other minimum employment standards for employees working in Ontario for employers subject to provincial jurisdiction, and the  Labour Relations Act, 1995  (LRA), which governs labour-management relations in the province. Read more

Ontario, Canada: Bill 47, Making Ontario Open for Business Act, receives royal assent

On November 21, 2018, Bill 47,  Making Ontario Open for Business Act , received Royal Assent, repealing a number of amendments made to Ontario labour and employment law. Bill 47 effectively reverses certain changes made by a law enacted last year—Bill 148,  The Fair Workplaces Better Jobs Act, 2017 . That law  significantly amended  Ontario's  Employment Standards Act, 2000  (ESA),  Labour Relations Act, 1995  (OLRA) and the  Occupational Health and Safety Act .  Most Bill 148 amendments took effect by April 1, 2018, with the remaining amendments to the ESA scheduled to take effect on January 1, 2019.   Read more

Potential immigration consequences for workers and investors in the Canadian cannabis industry

Canada legalized the recreational use of marijuana effective October 17, 2018. Although many American states have loosened their marijuana restrictions, including those on the U.S.-Canada border like Washington, Michigan, and Maine, the use and possession of marijuana and marijuana products remain illegal under U.S. federal law. Mike Niezgoda, a spokesman at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) office in Buffalo, has indicated that those participating in the marijuana business may be turned away at the border, saying: “Working or having involvement in the legal marijuana industry in U.S. states where it is deemed legal or Canada may affect an individual’s admissibility to the U.S.” 1  Likewise, according to Todd Owen, Executive Assistant Commissioner for CBP, “[f]acilitating the proliferation of the legal marijuana industry in U.S. states where it is deemed legal or Canada may affect an individual’s admissibility to the U.S.” 2  While Mr. Owen did not specify any minimum level of investment in the industry, he signaled the agency’s focus was on those attempting to bring the sector to the United States. 3  Border agency press officer Stephanie Malin clarified “that industry workers or investors could face a permanent ban on travelling to America.” 4  As she reiterated, “[u]nder U.S. federal law, marijuana isn’t legal.” 5 Read more

Join Littler LLP for its 2018 Canada Conference

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Ontario, Canada: Proposed Legislation Would Repeal Certain Amendments Made by Bill 148

On October 23, 2018, the Ontario government  announced  its intent to repeal amendments made by Bill 148,  The Fair Workplaces Better Jobs Act, 2017   (Bill 148). Bill 148, which received Royal Assent on November 27, 2017, made significant changes to Ontario labour and employment law by amending the  Employment Standards Act, 2000  (ESA), the  Labour Relations Act , 1995 (LRA), and the  Occupational Health and Safety Act . Most Bill 148 amendments were in force by April 1, 2018, with the remaining amendments to the ESA to become effective on January 1, 2019. According to the government, the proposed legislation—Bill 47,  Making Ontario Open for Business Act— would repeal the amendments  “that are causing employers the most concern and unnecessary burden.” Read more

The Legalization of Recreational Marijuana Doesn't Translate into a Free-for-All in the Workplace

This article was first published in  HR Professional Magazine . Read more

Littler Global Guide - Canada - Q3

Browse through brief employment and labor law updates from around the globe. Contact a  Littler attorney  for more information or view our  global locations . Read more

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