David Rotfleisch

David Rotfleisch
Rotfleisch & Samulovitch
Founder & Principal
Tax

David Rotfleisch, founder and principal of the Toronto-based firm Rotfleisch & Samulovitch PC, focuses on income tax law.

He graduated from McGill University with a Bachelor of Commerce in 1975 and became a chartered accountant in 1977. Mr. Rotfleisch went on to earn a law degree from Osgoode Hall Law School and was called to the Ontario Bar in 1983. He founded the firm in 1987.

A lawyer and chartered professional accountant, Mr. Rotfleisch handles simple and complex tax and estate planning matters, as well as tax amnesty and tax litigation issues. His clients include start-up businesses, resident and non-resident business owners, and corporations.

With a background in the computer and IT industry, Mr. Rotfleisch also assists with technology matters, including high-tech legal issues such as software development and intellectual property.

David Rotfleisch In The News
Selling, trading cryptocurrency a 'taxable event'

Although taxpayers trading bitcoin for another cryptocurrency may think they do not have to report the transaction, they need to be aware that in the eyes of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), a swap constitutes a taxable disposition,  Canadian tax lawyer David J. Rotfleisch tells AdvocateDaily.com . Read more

Upcoming changes make CRA's VDP less attractive to taxpayers

Changes to the Voluntary Disclosures Program (VDP) set to take effect March 1 will make the initiative far less attractive to taxpayers and may lead to its effective demise, Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch  tells AdvocateDaily.com . Read more

Changes to tax reform proposals not beneficial to lawyers

While the federal government recently moved to scale back the tax reforms it proposed for professional corporations last year, the changes that will be the most helpful are not available to lawyers, Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch  tells Law Times . Read more

CRA move to obtain PayPal information not yet an enforcement action

Although PayPal has informed certain business account holders that it was recently ordered to release the details of their transactions to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), this alone does not constitute an enforcement action or an audit by the taxman,  Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch  writes in The Lawyer’s Daily . Read more

Profit on sale of bitcoins reportable to CRA

Even though bitcoin is bought and sold in cyberspace, any gains realized on a digital currency transaction must be reported to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA),  Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch tells BNN . Read more

Announcement of audit targeting wealthy serves a purpose: Rotfleisch

Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) audits based on postal code may not be new, but in discussing its latest initiative targeting wealthy neighbourhoods, the taxman likely has a number of specific goals in mind,  Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch tells AdvocateDaily.com . Read more

CRA vows action on Canadian tax evaders exposed in Paradise Papers

OTTAWA — The Canada Revenue Agency says it won't hesitate to investigate new evidence of offshore tax evasion in the wake of a second massive leak of tax haven financial records. Read more

Inappropriate for LSUC to impose values on licensees: Rotfleisch

While it may be simple for legal professionals to adopt the Law Society of Upper Canada’s (LSUC) new requirement to sign a statement of principles on diversity,  Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch  tells The Lawyer’s Daily that it is inappropriate for the regulator to impose values on its members. Read more

Changes to proposed tax rules 'less damaging' for small businesses

Although elements of the previously proposed changes to the small business tax in Canada have survived and will create compliance burdens for taxpayers, a vigorous response from the public and professional advisers has led to changes that are less damaging than the original release, Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch  writes in The Lawyer’s Daily . Read more

Lawsuit over GA fee likely to end up before SCC

It is likely that Canada’s top court will eventually weigh in on the issues raised in a recently launched lawsuit against the Ontario government, that argues the global adjustment fee (GA) charged on energy bills is unconstitutional,  Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch  tells  The Lawyer’s Daily . Read more

CRA stats show 'strong argument' for retaining current VDP rules

Recent figures released by the government that show a large number of Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) audits resulted in only a small number of criminal charges are a strong argument against proposed changes to the Voluntary Disclosures Program (VDP), Canadian tax lawyer David J. Rotfleisch tells AdvocateDaily.com . Read more

Gov't starting to tax shared economy at consumer level

The Quebec government’s recent agreement with Airbnb that allows the online hospitality service to collect and remit the tax on lodging on behalf of hosts represents the first time a province has directly taxed the shared economy at the consumer level, Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch  tells The Lawyer’s Daily . Read more

Small businesses, Trudeau govt headed for autumn tax showdown

Ottawa's fall parliamentary session is a couple of weeks away and Canadians are already getting a preview of what could be the season's main event: a scrap over the Liberals' proposed tax changes. The Trudeau government's controversial plan is designed to close loopholes that it says give a growing number of wealthy, small-business owners an unfair tax advantage over other Canadians. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau himself has rejected criticism over the plan, arguing Friday he “will make no apologies'' for his commitment to fairness. But when it comes to the tax proposals, his Liberals have left themselves room to manoeuvre, if necessary. The mid-July announcement launched a 75-day consultation period, ending Oct. 2, to allow people to digest the complex proposals and provide feedback that could lead to adjustments. At the time, Finance Minister Bill Morneau admitted he anticipated some push back. His prediction is coming true. Opposition has been growing through the summer and it's clear critics of the plan won't watch the changes go through without a fight. An organized movement argues the tax incentives targeted by the Liberals are critical for Canada's economically crucial small-business sector. It insists the current tax structure is necessary for entrepreneurs, including those in the so-called middle class, who take personal financial risks when they decide to open a company. The backlash has been led by a coalition of more than 40 industry associations as well as the government's Conservative rivals. Individuals, including tax professionals, doctors and engineers, have also spoken out against the changes. At the centre of the storm is a three-part plan to eliminate tax loopholes and even out what Morneau describes as an “unfair playing field.'' One change seeks to eliminate an incentive that enables small-business owners to use their corporations as a way to shift some their income to family members who face lower personal tax rates, even if those relatives are not active in the business. Ottawa says addressing unfair “income sprinkling'' with these changes would provide an estimated $250 million per year in additional federal revenue. Another change would limit the use of private corporations to make passive investments in stocks or real estate. The proposed change is designed to ensure that taxes on passive investments inside a corporation are treated the same way as those outside the company. The third reform would limit the ability to convert a corporation's regular income into capital gains that are typically taxed at a lower rate. The Liberals have maintained the changes are aimed at creating more fairness in the system, while many opponents have described it as a cash grab. Read more

All taxpayers feel impact of construction sector's cash economy

For the average homeowner, it is important to pay contractors via cheque or credit card and receive a receipt, as participating in the underground cash economy can have severe implications for all taxpayers,  Canadian tax lawyer   David J. Rotfleisch  writes in Canadian Accountant . Read more

Proposed changes would lead to demise of CRA's VDP

If enacted, recently proposed changes to the Voluntary Disclosures Program (VDP) will have the effect of ultimately killing what is arguably one of the most effective initiatives administered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), Canadian tax lawyer David J. Rotfleisch writes in The Globe and Mail . Read Canadian Accountant Read more

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