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Caryma Sa'd's media roundup

Toronto landlord/tenant and criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d is frequently called upon by the media as a trusted source for their news stories, particularly for her focus on legal issues involving cannabis and in cases of harassment.

See the complete list below:

A decision by Legal Aid Ontario to decrease funding will have a devastating effect on clinics engaged in advocacy, including the Advocacy Centre for Tenants Ontario, landlord and tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Toronto Star.

Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY, says the cuts will make it more difficult for both sides in a dispute to get a date to be before a tribunal.

“It is really going to throw the entire system into disarray,” she tells the Star.

The delays will leave tenants unfamiliar with their Residential Tenancies Act rights, and unable to access help, “floundering” and could “sink” small landlords who can’t afford to carry unpaid rent while awaiting a hearing, she says.

“It doesn’t take that long of nonpayment for rent for somebody to theoretically end up in the hole,” Sa’d says. “Every level of the system right now would benefit from increased funding and more attention paid to the spirit of the RTA and we are moving far and dangerously away from that.”

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Toronto cannabis lawyer Caryma Sa’d discussing the ongoing push for just marijuana policy with City News. View here

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Toronto criminal lawyer and bencher candidate Caryma Sa’d may be the first cannabis-focused lawyer to become a Law Society of Ontario bencher, The London Free Press reports.

“Historically, it’s been very established lawyers who are sitting,” Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY says. “Part of what motivated me to put my name forward was that . . . the discussions taking place at Convocation were so divorced from my own reality, and I think it’s an important perspective to have because it rounds out the thinking and allows for better decision-making.”

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The lack of bencher rules for campaign funding and donations is shocking, Toronto criminal lawyer and bencher candidate Caryma Sa’d tells The Lawyer' Daily.

“I think that going forward it is maybe something that Convocation should be looking at. And I say that because there are no spending limits currently and the LSO has something of a monopoly on advertising, at least by way of direct mailouts or e-mail lists. It’s expensive and that puts sole practitioners, recent calls, [or] anyone who doesn’t have the backing of a big firm at a disadvantage. That was not the purpose of the campaign, but I think it’s something that’s come up in light of the criticism we’ve received,” Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY says.

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 Marijuana legalization brought “a rollback of certain things that had been taken for granted," Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d  tells Leafly.

“The fact that there are prison terms in the Cannabis Act that surpass what previously existed under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, that’s problematic,” Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY says. 

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Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells Lift & Co. that she questions the validity of the results from roadside screening tests for cannabis impairment.

“It's testing if the molecule exists in your body, but it's not testing whether you are safe to drive. And you know, the device itself was developed in Germany and we have a different climate here, so if this is being used in the dead of winter, will the results be as accurate?" Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY says. "So there's a lot of question marks about the validity of the science and I think that that will lend itself to possible defences down the line.”

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It's not surprising that non-government licensed marijuana retailers continue to operate in Ontario, says Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d. "It seems that the market is not balanced. There are many people who would like to participate in this market, but there is not enough licences," Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACYtells Radio-Canada

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Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d  says she is concerned about the severity of a 10-month jail sentence recently imposed by a Manitoba judge on a man caught with 86.3 grams of marijuana.

"Ten months is a very long time for a non-violent drug offence, especially given that the particular drug has just been legalized," Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACYtells The Leaf. "Past judgments affect future decisions. ... If this sentence isn't appealed, it's going to be a reference point for future cases."

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Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d raises privacy concerns about ID scans at Ontario retail cannabis stores in an interview with City TV, with here, and Global News. View here

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There was much "disappointment" over the launch of cannabis shops in Ontario, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells CTV NewsCP24, and the GrowthOp

"The way that it rolled out with a lottery that seemed completely arbitrary, no real merit component, it's not surprising that only a handful of stores in an already artificially low number of licenses, were able to open," said Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY.

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Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d is among several candidates in the Law Society of Ontario’s bencher election that say they will donate a sum of money for every ballot cast by a lawyer who was called to the bar in the past decade.

“The idea is: How do we get recent calls, who are a particularly underrepresented in terms of votes — which then translates into underrepresentation in terms of presence — how do we make them feel like their vote matters?” Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY, tells Canadian Lawyer.

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"We get to be a part of history, it is a pretty cool thing to be part of the end of prohibition. And so here we are in front of the first legal storefront," Toronto social justice lawyer Caryma Sa’d is quoted in Civilized about The Hunny Pot retail marijuana store opening in Toronto. "Kudos to the store for pulling it together. It wasn't an easy feat with all the hurdles put in place. So we're excited to support their business," said Sa’d, founder and principal of SADVOCACY.

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The first person in line outside The Hunny Pot retail marijuana store was Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d, who had been camped outside the retail pot store with her assistant Marie Kamara, reports Toronto.comCBC Radio-CanadaBayview-News.comBloomberg NewsLeafly.com, Lift & Co.Vice, and NarCity. “I wasn’t sure what the scene would be and I would have hated to be fourth or fifth,” Sa’d, founder and principal of SADVOCACY, told Bloomberg.

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Toronto cannabis lawyer Caryma Sa’d, along with her assistant Marie Kamara were the first in line at the legal The Hunny Pot Cannabis Shop on Queen St. West, 24 hours before they become Toronto’s first legitimate pot shop. “I can’t wait to try the product,” Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY Professional Corporation, told the Toronto Star.

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 Toronto bencher candidate Caryma Sa’d tells Canadian Lawyer tweeting is a “crucial element” of how she shares editorial comics, takes part in discussions and connects with colleagues to be part of her bencher candidate podcast series.

Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY Professional Corporation, has been on Twitter since 2016 and has nearly 3,200 followers. She tells Canadian Lawyer the cost-effective nature of Twitter is an “equalizer” for lawyers who aren’t backed by large law firms or have a large sum of money put aside for the election.

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One of her clients, charged with forcible confinement and uttering threats, is a good candidate to be sentenced to time served, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Toronto Star. Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY Professional Corporation, has launched a crowdfunding campaign to help her client raise $5,000 for housing and basic needs after his release from jail.

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High tuition and staggering debt for new lawyers is ultimately bad for the public, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Toronto Star.

“Some of the costs get passed on to the client, which isn’t fair,” she tells the Star, adding lower tuition should translate into lower legal fees, but “the price tag can’t go down if the overhead costs of getting your law degree are so high.”

“If you want to keep fees low, you have to take on volume, but as a sole practitioner, that can be a recipe for things falling through the cracks,” says Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY Professional Corporation.

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A Canadian licensed cannabis producer should revisit the technology it is using following reports of a privacy breach after a mass email to patients revealed its personal information to other patients, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells TheGrowOP.com.

“I would hope that in very short order the the LP (licensed producer) would send a follow up email saying ‘Please delete the previous one, please destroy, do not use for any purpose. That would be kind of the bare minimum first step that they should be taking,’” says Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY Professional Corporation.

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Law Society of Ontario’s (LSO) statement of principles is an acknowledgement of its members pre-existing obligation to promote access to justice, and a component of access to justice is equality, diversity, and inclusion, Toronto criminal lawyer and bencher candidate Caryma Sa’d tells The Lawyer' Daily.

"To me it’s an affirmation that part of the privilege of being a lawyer means the responsibility of promoting values that are linked to justice," says Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY Professional Corporation. "The word ‘promote’ is central in all of this and my reading of the opposition to the SOP [statement of principles] is ‘promote’ means we’re compelled to do something. There are so many other ways to interpret that word. It could mean ‘uphold’ or ‘value’ or ‘acknowledge,’ so for me it’s a pre-existing obligation.” 

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While it would be helpful for the Law Society of Ontario to establish a baseline for lawyers’ tech knowledge through published best practices, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Law Times she doesn’t support anything as drastic as a test or exam. The law society does have a role in promoting public interest in terms of modernizing the court system, she says. “Lawyers are the ones on the ground who are experiencing . . . delays because of a lack of technology, especially in Ontario,” says Sa'd, founder and principal of SADVOCACY Professional Corporation, and a bencher hopeful.

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It shouldn’t matter what Metrolinx employees do on their own time, as long as they are sober and ready to work when their shift starts, Toronto criminal lawyer lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Toronto Observer  “If you’re fit for duty, as a general rule, you show up and you’re capable of performing your function, it shouldn’t matter what you do in your private time, and this policy runs contrary to that.”

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The process used for retail distribution of  cannabis in Ontario has been a "failure" for the user, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells maryjane.com. “Somehow we've ended up in a situation where the 40 brick and mortar stores that were proposed by the Liberal government is a better scenario than what we're ending up with," Sa'd tells the online magazine.

"At some point, will there be stores established where people can go in and purchase cannabis? Yeah, there's probably going to be at least some of them, if not all of them, that are up and running by April. But is this an efficient or effective or logical or equitable way to go about cannabis distribution? No. I would consider this project a failure already for the user."

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Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d says she finds a Toronto regional transportation agency's move to ban recreational cannabis use by employees or contractors in nearly 140 job categories  "hugely problematic." “It seems very draconian and I’m not aware of anything similar,” Sa'd tells The Globe and Mail,  “This is the employer reaching in beyond the employee’s working hours and trying to regulate what they do in their free time. And so I find that hugely problematic, and more so because, as far as I know, there’s no evidence or data to suggest that cannabis use during non-work hours would have any impact on performance while at work.”

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The decision to cap cannabis retail licences in Ontario has taken a turn for the worse, leaving the retail market to 25 relative newcomers, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d says. “Why would we uproot an industry that existed? People who know how to work within it are now unable to participate because of an artificial limit on the number of licences,” she tells nowtoronto.com.

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The Ontario government's decision to temporarily cap cannabis retail licences to 25 is beyond confusing, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells growthop.com. “When we initially heard unlimited, that seemed like a very pro-small business move in line with what the current government purports to value. And now this restriction, it seems very arbitrary,” she says.

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Comprehensive data is necessary to track the effects of cannabis laws in Canada, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Winnipeg Free Press. "There’s so much importance in data. Especially with cannabis historically, the way it’s been policed and criminalized, it’s disproportionately affected marginalized groups the most, so it surprises me and it’s a little bit troubling that they’re not keeping data or statistics on that, because we risk repeating the same issues," she says.
 
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Vancouver medical cannabis patients and consumers will be left without fair access after B.C. Supreme Court decision, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Vancouver Star.

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Federal pardons for those with cannabis possession charges will open up employment opportunities, Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells Merry Jane.

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Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells Canadian Lawyer now that recreational cannabis is legal in Canada, she expects to see cannabis cultivation zoning bylaw cases becoming more commonplace.

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Blanket bans on cannabis use in condos that don't include exemptions for medical use are not likely to survive judicial scrutiny, Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Globe & Mail.

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Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells CBC that despite new laws aiming to deter landlords from evicting tenants in bad faith, she still sees a fair number of such cases in Toronto's competitive rental market.

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With cannabis prohibition still firmly in place in the U.S., Toronto lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells Bloomberg News there's a great deal of uncertainty for Canadians crossing the U.S. border because it's difficult to know how much involvement in cannabis could be seen as too much by U.S. officials.

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Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells Law Times she hopes the construction of a centralized courthouse in Toronto will be seized as an opportunity to make signficant improvements to the administration of justice.

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With the legalization of recreational cannabis just around the corner, medical patients who use marijuana will be under more scrutiny because there are now specific policies targeting them, especially in the workplace, Toronto lawyer Caryma Sa'd tells NOW magazine.

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Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Christian Science Monitor that many town councils are comprised of members who adhere to old schools of thought about "reefer madness" and as a result have a gut reaction to either ban retail cannabis shops outright or opt out of them for the time being.

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When recreational cannabis becomes legal on Oct. 17, there will still be restrictions on where you and can't light up, and those renting condos will have to abide by the rules set by the board of directors, Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells Global News.

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Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells CBC that while many tenants find their apartment insurance policies confusing, they should pay careful attention to three main components of their coverage: personal belongings, living expenses following a loss and personal injury and liability.

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The impact on Ontario municipalities that opt out of province's cannabis retail plan will be detrimental, including fewer job opportunities and less customer traffic — and their residents will still find ways to purchase and consume cannabis, Toronto lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells Canadian Lawyer.

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Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells the Toronto Star she frequently hears concerns from people about how consumer data will be protected by cannabis retailers.

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In the wake of a fire that forced 1,500 people from their apartment building, Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells CBC the fact there's no known contingency plan for the months-long wait facing residents is challenging as accommodations need to be taken into consideration.

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Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells CBC it's prudent for residents to seek independent legal advice in situations where landlords are requesting they sign a waiver before being allowed to re-enter their units following a fire.

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Those looking to rent Airbnb accommodations may have legal recourse in situations where the host raises the price of the rental after the booking request has been made, Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells City News.

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Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells CP24 News that with the legalization of cannabis in October, tensions will continue to mount between landlords and tenants with respect to home grows and even consumption within the home. She also expects issues to develop in condominiums that have bylaws in place to prohibit what would otherwise be legal activities.

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Those previously convicted of selling pot in dispensaries may have a difficult time entering the new retail market to sell pot once marijuana is legal, Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells CTV.

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Toronto criminal lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells CBC the lawsuit filed on behalf of a band member of the Mohawk First Nation for $13 million in damages reflects the level of harassment and intimidation faced by the man, which allegedly ranged from almost being run over by a truck to a home invasion that resulted in a gunshot being fired in his home.

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A dispute between a Toronto landlord and tenant over a medical marijuana grow-up may be at the extreme end of the spectrum, but Toronto landlord/tenant lawyer Caryma Sa’d tells Vice she expects to see a significant uptick in fights between landlords and tenants growing cannabis at home once legalization takes effect.

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