Health

The four elements that make a health-care team trustworthy

By Kate Dewhirst Trust. Trust is the foundation of healthcare. Without trust, patients delay receiving care. Without trust, patients do not share the truth that helps clinicians uncover what is actually happening. Read more

Drafting effective research funding agreements

By Michael Gleeson Innovations in health care are often the result of research and development initiatives. Such initiatives cannot be carried out without funding. Read more

Restraining high-risk patients sometimes a necessary evil: Shekter

Health-care staff are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to the restraint of high-risk patients, says Toronto health lawyer Brooke Shekter. Read more

Ontario Health Teams Wave 1: privacy and culture shift supports

By Kate Dewhirst You and your community have signed up to be a Wave 1 Ontario Health Team. Does it feel like you are on a roller coaster? You signed up. You’ve strapped yourself into the seat. Read more

No magic age when children make their own health privacy decisions

By Kate Dewhirst . This comes as a surprise to most lay people. In Ontario, and in many jurisdictions around the world, children make their own health privacy decisions when they are “capable” of doing so and not when they reach a specific age. Read more

Health professionals must address clients recording of discussions

Health professionals need to have clear guidelines about whether clients can record their discussions, with those either posted in the waiting room or discussed at the beginning of the appointment, says Toronto health lawyer Lonny Rosen . Read more

Addressing toxicity in teams a big issue in health-care field

Getting to the root cause of a toxic workplace can involve some deep digging and tough choices for senior leadership at health-care organizations, says Toronto health lawyer Kate Dewhirst . Read more

A medical professional's obligations regarding police requests

Health-care providers need to stand their ground when police officers express an interest in patients’ medical information, says Toronto health lawyer Brooke Shekter . Read more

Mere possibility of harm insufficient to deny access to records

Health-care organizations must provide individuals with all of their personal health information — including the names of those individuals providing the service — unless one of the exemptions in the law applies, says Toronto health lawyer Lonny Rosen . Read more

Are patients entitled to know the names of health care providers?

By Kate Dewhirst . In the last month, I have been asked three times a variation on the theme of this question: “Do we have to tell a patient the full names of our staff if the patient asks?” The answer is generally, yes. Read more

Preparation key to successful Ontario Health Team application

Organizations hoping to be part of an Ontario Health Team (OHT) should be fine-tuning plans before invitations to submit a full application go out next month, says Toronto health lawyer Michael Gleeson . Read more

Providing option for assisted death a personal choice

If patients request medically assisted death, it is imperative that physicians and nurse practitioners are aware of the legal requirements involved in that process, says Toronto health lawyer Elyse Sunshine . Read more

Substance over style: Golden not your typical litigator

Toronto health lawyer David Golden is the antithesis of a stereotypical litigator — more like a surgeon, cutting quickly and precisely to the heart of the matter than the flamboyant portrayal seen on legal TV shows. Read more

Court awards $50,000 to doctor due to defamatory postings

By Lonny Rosen and Elyse Sunshine . Many health professionals have concerns about postings made about them on rating websites. A recent case heard in Kingston, Ont. dealt with defamatory comments written about a doctor on a popular website. Read more

Reasonable for psychiatrist to decline patient’s request

By Elyse Sunshine and Lonny Rosen . A patient complained about the conduct of a psychiatrist, stating that the psychiatrist wrote false information in the patient’s medical records, but would not amend it. The patient also complained that the psychiatrist breached her confidentiality by providing these records to her family doctor. Read more